The Top 10 Social Media Marketing Resources for Christmas 2017

The Christmas season is all about giving. Extend the gifts of the season to your social media audience by using the most festive and helpful holiday social media marketing tools. I’ve curated The Social Campfire‘s favorite Christmas marketing resources. Which is your favorite?

Best Christmas Social Media Marketing Tools

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1. Freepik Christmas Vectors 

This website has tens of thousands of free Christmas vectors for personal and commercial use. Download them in .AI or .EPS format to create a custom graphic for your Facebook, Twitter, G+, or LinkedIn profile. You can also use them to design a header for your holiday email newsletter.

2. Canva 

Canva is a creative app that inspires users to create beautiful social media graphics, blog headers, infographics, and more. It’s also extremely easy to use, even if you are not a designer. Use their free or paid art – or upload your business logo, stock photos, or vectors to finish your custom holiday project. I personally like using it to create festive social media graphics and cover images.

3. GIPHY

Add a little Christmas fun to your December social media posts. GIFs are one of the most popular ways to bring tidings of joy this holiday season and are perfect for direct to consumer or retail businesses. GIPHY is my favorite royalty-free GIF platform and has both beautiful and funny GIFs available. Pair them with a couple lines of creative written copy to delight your followers.

4. Facebook Advertising 

If you have a holiday sale going on at your store or want to share your Christmas blogs with a larger following, Facebook advertising is a great way to meet your goal. For a modest budget, you can promote your post to touch potential customers that are not already part of your follower count. Specify the age, geographic region, or interests of your potential customer and run the ad for a time span that works for your needs. You can also reach an Instagram audience with Facebook ads.

5. Christmas Pinterest Boards

Christmas themed Pinterest boards are fun to create and help you meet your business goals. If your store sells stocking stuffers or White Elephant gifts, create a board that showcases the best things to buy. If you are a B2B company, you can pin anything from articles that share Christmas money saving tips to holiday infographics and educational blogs about nutrition and health.

6. Instagram Contests 

If your company has time to plan a giveaway for Christmas, Instagram is a great place to hold the contest. Post a photo of the giveaway item and tell your followers how they can win it. Ideas include gift cards to your shop or restaurant, festive goodie baskets, and tickets to Christmas plays and events. Be sure to spell out the rules and details carefully, either in the post copy or at the bottom of your graphic.

7. Christmas Clip Art 

If you need holiday clip art, The Balance has over 3,800 free Christmas resources for you. From trees to reindeers to Santa hats, there is something for every brand and function. Use these images to craft your social media posts, cover photos, and advertisements.

8. Holiday Hashtags 

Reach a wider audience with your holiday posts. Hashtags are essential in making it possible. Our company analytics tool Sprout Social provides a full guide to each holiday. Be sure to include the basics like #Christmas and #Christmas2017. You may find an additional view gems in the link that apply to your business.

9. Pixabay 

Pixabay is one of the largest and most useful royalty free image databases on the Internet. Click the link above to find themed photos that will add a merry feeling to your social media posts, advertisements, and profiles. Find everything from vectors to natural-looking photos with people in them.

10. Punchbowl 

If you need a quick way to directly reach your most important followers and customers, Punchbowl will allow you to design and distribute fun Christmas greetings without spending a dime. It is perfect for a small list of people you want to reach to thank or wish a Merry Christmas. Simply pull names or contacts from your social media profiles and write a custom greeting that will really stand out. This is an especially helpful tool for companies who do not yet have an email marketing plan.

There are so many easy ways to make your Christmas social media marketing strategy stand out. Use one or more of the tools above to make your festive holiday marketing plan happen! If you need assistance with seasonal marketing for Christmas and beyond, The Social Campfire can do everything from writing impactful copy to managing your social media profiles. To learn more about working with a remote social media specialist, call The Social Campfire in Orlando, FL, at (321) 574-3854. For information about the company social media marketing services, visit us online

#FridayFact: 6 Social Media Factoids for You to Share

Happy Friday! We’re Celebrating #FridayFact with these 6 awesome factoids for you share on social media.

Which one is your favorite?

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10 Awesome #FridayFact Features

1.  Sea Cucumbers eat with their feet.

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2. Hawaiian Punch was originally developed as an ice cream topping.

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3. Captain Morgan is a real person. He was a Welsh pirate who later became Jamaica’s lieutenant governor.

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4. There are about 70 total ingredients in the McDonald’s McRib.

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5. Until the 1950s, stop signs were yellow.

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6. George Washington insisted his continental army be permitted a quart of beer per day as part of their rations.

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Comment on our blog to add another fact to the list!

For help with social media calendars and fact posts, email us.

LinkedIn courts users in emerging markets with LinkedIn Lite, online job placement tests — TechCrunch

As LinkedIn continues to wait for the close of its $26.2 billion acquisition by Microsoft, it continues to build out its business, with the latest developments on the international front. Last week, LinkedIn announced that it had hit 100 million users in Asia Pacific, and today at an event in Delhi, India, it unveiled three new…

via LinkedIn courts users in emerging markets with LinkedIn Lite, online job placement tests — TechCrunch

How the Summer Olympics Won and Lost on Social Media

How the Summer Olympics Won and Lost on Social Media_What Can Be Learned

Forget the Super Bowl: the Summer Olympics are the world’s largest marketing event. The London 2012 Olympics generated $1.3 billion in advertising spending. The potential to amplify a company’s message is huge with an audience spanning across borders and demographics. For an Olympics marketer, the ability to capitalize on the 1-plus billion voices conversing on social platforms about the Olympics is a must.

Not everything about the Rio 2016 Olympics was a social media success. Savvy content professionals can learn quite a bit about audience engagement from the Olympics’ social wins and losses.

Winning the Social Games

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This popular meme circulated shortly after swimming heats began during the 2016 Rio Olympics.

1) Meme-volution. One of the best qualities of the Olympics is its ability to create cultural phenomenons thanks to stand out performances. Think gymnast Nadia Comenaci’s perfect 10 or former world record holder sprinter Michael Johnson.

Fast forward to the modern age. Now conversation trends involve more than a stunning Olympic performance. The winter Sochi games created the memorable #sochiproblems. Rio 2016 inspired a collection of viral memes. Michael Phelps’ death stare, Usain Bolt’s cheeky smile, the bored lifeguard in the background of Olympics swimming: the audience took these snapshots and were able to interact with the event by making them relatable to their lives. That’s the value of memes: to capture something humorous or ironic that speaks to a greater audience.

2) Social Platform for Justice. The most powerful use of social media is to inspire thoughtful conversation on important social issues and become an engine for change. Very early in this Olympic cycle, conversation erupted around sexism in sports using hashtags like #everydaysexism and #mansplaining. The social community was enraged by the Chicago Tribune’s article of Olympic shooter Corey Cogdell-Unrein that focused on her husband’s football career, the broadcaster declaring a husband “the person responsible for her performance” after a Hungarian swimmer’s gold medal, and announcers calling Katie Ledecky “the male Michael Phelps.”

Lists tracking sexist coverage appeared across news feeds. The story drew national attention to how society and the media addresses the performance of athletic women. Reporters and news outlets issued apologies and ran corrections. Some news outlets continued to slip-up, but by the end of Olympics coverage there were fewer gaffes, showing social’s power to influence the greater conversation.

3) Rio 2016 organizers partnering with social. The International Olympics Committee recognized the power of social media to share the stories of the Olympics Games. It recent years, it created outlets on platforms like Facebook, Youtube and Twitter. Perhaps the best indicator of the IOC jumping on the social bandwagon would be its new partnerships. Twitter launched hundreds of Olympic-specific emojis and projected live tweets on Rio’s Arcos da Lapa aqueduct. Airbnb became the first “alternative accommodations” official sponsor of the Rio Olympics. The company took advantage of the unique partnership with a #StayWithMe campaign and with special call-to-actions on reservation pages. NBC brought in a dozen Buzzfeed staffers to create viral social content like the women’s wrestling team smashing watermelons and the Snapchat story “8 Problems Tall People Have” with Olympic swimmer Townley Haas. By embracing partnerships, event organizers generated early enthusiasm and kept the audiences entertained throughout the 15 days.

Losing the Social Games

NBC brokered an exclusive multi-billion dollar coverage rights deal with the IOC lasting until 2032. Their marketing promised comprehensive coverage of the 2016 Rio Olympics.

1) Tight restrictions on live video and streaming. The top complaint about this year’s Olympics concerned event coverage. One of several coverage complaints focused on accessibility. The inability to live stream this Olympics caused significant issues. Fewer 18-to-45-year-olds tuned in. While NBC claims it’s because the audience watched on other channels within the NBC family, the social conversation paints a different picture. For various reasons, users strugglers to watch events live when they wished. By the time the events were shown, in their highly packaged and edited format, the audience knew the results thanks to social sharing. Why watch a 45-second clip four hours later when you already know the outcome?

Furthermore, live videos posted by on-location members of the spectating public were quickly removed. Rower Meghan O’Leary’s post-closing ceremony video, which she thought would not violate Rule 40–more on that below–was quickly deleted from Instagram. Today’s consumers are accustomed to being involved with the action as it happens. By severely limiting on-demand access, users felt less engaged and let down by the Rio Olympics.

2) Pesky IOC Rule 40. This is comprehensive rule concerning Olympic marketing and sponsorships. A very basic summary of the social media implications of the rule is thus: non-sponsor brands can’t use a reference to Olympic results, can’t retweet or repost from official Olympic accounts, or use Olympic pictures. The restriction includes using social hashtags like #Rio2016, #TeamUSA, and #RoadtoRio. The United States Olympic Committee enforces Rule 40 under Code Chapter 2205. The rule is intended to prevent non-sponsors from violating intellectual property rights, but the rule is both confusing and restrictive. It’s as though the USOC is saying don’t discuss the largest event of the year unless you’ve paid for it. This notion goes completely against the nature of social media. People are going to discuss the Olympics and restricting the conversation is against the nature of free speech. There must be way to honor sponsorships and encourage national conversation. Some non-sponsor brands (like Adidas) did find a way around Rule 40 to launch successful marketing campaigns tagging off Olympic coverage.

The Olympic Lessons

Remember the driving force behind social media success is the public must own the conversation. That’s why unexpected, unmanufactured moments go viral. Embracing the power of social media partnerships allows marketers to reach new audiences. Welcoming the audience to take part in the event or conversation by providing easy, on-demand access is critical to social success. Hopefully the lessons from Rio will be learned in time for the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea.

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